Katherine Crytzer – Nominee to the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Tennessee

36-year-old Katherine Crytzer was already before the Senate seeking an executive appointment when she was nominated for a federal judgeship.  While Crytzer’s nomination to be Inspector General was never confirmed by the Senate, her nomination to be a federal judge remains an open question.

Background

Born in 1984, Katherine A. Crytzer graduated from Middle Tennessee State University in 2006 and attended George Mason University Law School, graduating in 2009.  Crytzer then clerked for Judge Steven Colloton on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit.

After her clerkship, Crytzer joined Kirkland & Ellis as an associate.  In 2014, Crytzer joined the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Kentucky as a federal prosecutor.  In 2017, Crytzer joined the Office of Legal Policy at the Department of Justice.  Since 2020, Crytzer has served as Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Policy in the Department of Justice.

In 2020, Crytzer was nominated to be the Inspector General for the Tennessee Valley Authority, replacing acting Inspector General Jill Matthews.[1]  However, Crytzer’s nomination came under fire for her refusal to disavow the Administration’s practice of dismissing Inspector Generals for their investigation and oversight activities.[2]  Crytzer’s nomination cleared the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee by a narrow 12-11 vote, but never received a vote on the Senate floor.

History of the Seat

Crytzer has been nominated to fill a seat on the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Tennessee.  This seat opened on September 10, 2020, with the untimely death of Judge Pamela Reeves.

Legal Career

Crytzer started her legal career by clerking on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit and then in private practice at Kirkland & Ellis.  While at the firm, Crytzer was part of a legal team that challenged California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard as being pre-empted by federal law, and discriminating against interstate commerce in violation of the Dormant Commerce Clause.[3]

From 2014 to 2017, Crytzer worked as a federal prosecutor in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Kentucky.  As a prosecutor, Crytzer argued before the Sixth Circuit in support of the stop, detention, and frisk of suspected drug traffickers.[4]  A 2-1 decision of the Sixth Circuit held that the Officer lacked probable cause for the frisk, and vacated the conviction.[5] 

Since 2017, Crytzer has worked at the Department of Legal Policy, working primarily on judicial nominations.  In this role, Crytzer helped “shepherd” the nomination of Justice Brett Kavanaugh through the Senate.[6]

Writings

As a law student, Crytzer authored a law review article considering when, under Supreme Court precedent, the publication of unfavorable information about a public employee implicates their due process interests.[7]  Crytzer argued that the Supreme Court should confirm an “actual publication” test adopted by two circuits, holding that the only way that an employee’s due process rights would be harmed is with the “actual publication” of the unfavorable information to third parties.[8]

Overall Assessment

With less than ten weeks left in the Trump Presidency, Crytzer faces a narrow window for confirmation.  Additionally, given her youth, the opposition to her executive appointment, and her work on Justice Kavanaugh’s confirmation process, Crytzer is likely to be considered a controversial nominee.


[1] Georgiana Vines, Katie Crytzer Introduced as Potential TVA Inspector General, Knox News, May 31, 2020, https://www.knoxnews.com/story/news/columnists/georgiana-vines/2020/06/01/katie-crytzer-introduced-potential-tva-inspector-general/5284749002/.

[2] Newswire, Democrats Balk at TVA Inspector General Pick, Greenwire, July 1, 2020.

[3] See Rocky Mt. Farmers Union v. Corey, 730 F.3d 1070 (9th Cir. 2012).

[4] See United States v. Noble, 762 F.3d 509 (6th Cir. 2014).

[5] See id. at 529.

[6] See Jerry Lambe, Trump’s Latest Judicial Nominee Is DOJ Attorney Who Helped Kavanaugh’s Confirmation to Supreme Court, Newstex Blogs, Sept. 16, 2020.

[7] Katherine Crytzer, You’re Fired! Bishop v. Wood: When Does a Letter in a Former Public Employee’s Personnel File Deny a Due Process Liberty Right, 16 Geo. Mason L. Rev. 447 (Winter 2009).

[8] See id. at 449.

1 Comment

  1. Crytzer had her Judiciary Committee hearing on November 18th, along with 7th Circuit nominee Thomas Kirsch – a sign that Senate Republicans intend to get her confirmed. There should be one more hearing opportunity for announced 1st Circuit nominee Raúl M. Arias-Marxuach, and those few District Court nominees lucky enough to be included.

    Like

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