Judge Sarah Merriam – Nominee to the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut

As compared to the outspoken Judge Williams or the young Sarala Nagala, the nomination of U.S. Magistrate Judge Sarah Merriam represents the most conventional of the three Connecticut nominees for the district court.

Background

Sarah A.L. Merriam earned her B.A. from Georgetown University in 1993 and her J.D. from Yale Law School in 2000. After graduating law school, Merriam joined the Hartford office of Cowdery, Ecker, & Murphy as an Associate. In 2007, Merriam moved to the public sector as an Assistant Federal Defender, staying in the office for eight years. In 2015, Merriam was chosen to be a federal magistrate judge, replacing Judge Holly Fitzsimmons. Merriam currently serves in this capacity.

History of the Seat

Merriam has been nominated to a vacancy on the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut that opened with Judge Janet Hall’s move to senior status on January 21, 2021.

Legal Career

Merriam started her legal career as an associate at Cowdery, Ecker, & Murphy, where she worked alongside partner Steven Ecker, who now serves on the Connecticut Supreme Court. Among the cases that Merriam and Ecker worked on together, they represented Directors of Reflexite Corp. in defending against a suit alleging that they violated their fiduciary duties to the corporation. See Frank v. LoVetere, 363 F. Supp. 2d 327 (D. Conn. 2005).

From 2007 to 2014, Merriam worked in the Office of the Federal Defender, representing indigent defendants in Connecticut federal court. Among the cases she handled with the office, Merriam represented Michael Danzi, one of two brothers charged with participating in a drug distribution ring importing marijuana from Canada. United States v. Danzi, 726 F. Supp. 2d 109 (D. Conn. 2009).

Jurisprudence

Merriam has served as a U.S. Magistrate Judge since her appointment in 2015, where she handles detention, discovery disputes, misdemeanors, and social security/benefits cases. As an example of a matter she handled, Merriam affirmed an administrative decision denying disability benefits for Dana Poole, finding that substantial evidence supported the determination that Poole’s disabilities were not sufficiently severe to qualify her for the benefits. Poole v. Saul, 462 F. Supp.3d 137 (D. Conn. 2020).

In another notable decision, Merriam ruled against the Libertarian Party of Connecticut, finding that the plaintiffs had not shown that Connecticut’s petitioning requirements were overly burdensome on the party. Libertarian Party of Conn. v. Merrill, 470 F. Supp. 3d (D. Conn. 2020).

Overall Assessment

With experience in private practice, as a federal defender, and as a federal magistrate, and with few controversial cases under her belt, Merriam is likely the least controversial of the group of three nominees put forward for the District of Connecticut. She will likely be confirmed with bipartisan support.

3 Comments

  1. Pingback: Where We Stand: Assessing Vacancies and Nominations in the Federal Judiciary – The Northeast | The Vetting Room

  2. Pingback: Pennsylvania Member of Congress Tracking Report - 10/10/21

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