Judge Bridget Bade – Nominee to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

A federal magistrate judge for the District of Arizona, Bade was selected to serve on the Ninth Circuit after the White House rejected the top candidate suggested by Arizona senators and two candidates the White House considered never made it to nomination.  As a “compromise” candidate, Bade is likely to see a smooth confirmation.

Background

An Arizona native, Bade was born Bridget Ann Shelton in Phoenix in 1965.  Bade received a B.A. summa cum laude from Arizona State University in 1987 and a J.D. from the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University in 1990.[1]  After graduating from law school, Bade clerked for Judge Edith Jones on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and then joined the Department of Justice in the Environmental Torts Litigation Section of the Civil Division.[2]

In 1995, Bade returned to Arizona to be a Shareholder at Beshears Wallwork Bellamy in Phoenix (the firm would later merge with Steptoe and Johnson).[3]  Eleven years later, she moved to become a federal prosecutor with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Arizona.[4]

In 2012, Chief Judge Roslyn Silver selected Bade to be a U.S. Magistrate Judge on the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona.  Bade serves on that court currently.

History of the Seat

Bade has been nominated for an Arizona seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.  This seat opened on October 11, 2016 when Judge Barry Silverman moved to senior status.  With the vacancy opening three weeks before the 2016 Presidential election, President Obama made no nomination to fill the vacancy.

In April 2017, Arizona senators John McCain and Jeff Flake, both Republicans, recommended Assistant U.S. Attorney Dominic Lanza to fill the vacancy, alongside Bade and Arizona Supreme Court Justice Ann Scott Timmer as secondary choices.[5]  However, the White House wanted Lanza’s colleague, Kory Langhofer, for the seat, believing that Langhofer was more conservative.[6]

The Trump Administration allegedly axed Lanza for the Ninth Circuit seat based on former U.S. Attorney Paul Charlton’s support of his candidacy, as Administration officials were upset at Charlton for prosecuting Republican Rep. Rick Renzi during the Bush Administration.[7]  Instead, Lanza was nominated and confirmed to a district court seat.

As for the Ninth Circuit vacancy, the White House vetted but declined to nominate Langhofer, as well as their next choice, DOJ Attorney (and White House Counsel alum) James Burnham.[8]  Finally, in April 2018, over a year after her name was originally sent to the White House, Bade was interviewed to fill the vacancy.[9]  She was nominated on August 27, 2018.

Political Activity

Bade has a fairly limited political history, having hosted a political reception for Mike Bailey, a Republican candidate for Maricopa County Attorney in 2004.[10]  Additionally, Bade gave a $250 contribution to Sen. Jon Kyl, a Republican, in 2006.[11]

Unlike most of Trump’s appellate nominees, Bade does not appear to be a member of the Federalist Society for Law and Policy.[12]

Legal Experience

Before joining the bench, Bade worked both in private practice and as a government attorney.  In this role, Bade handled primarily civil and appellate law.  Over the course of her career, Bade has tried three bench trials in federal court and two state court jury trials.[13]  Early in her career, Bade was part of a legal team defending the United States against a class action alleging that leaks from a defense facility had contaminated their groundwater.[14]

Notably, Bade handled two catastrophic tort suits against the U.S. Border Patrol, involving injuries suffered from passengers in vehicles crossing the border as they attempted to evade Border Patrol agents.[15]  Bade was able to successfully settle both cases and received a commendation from the Border Patrol from her work on the matters.

Jurisprudence

Bade has spent the last six years serving as U.S. Magistrate Judge in the District of Arizona.  In this role, Bade presides by consent over civil matters and misdemeanors, assists district judges with discovery and settlement, and writes reports and recommendations on legal issues.  In her six years, Bade has presided over three bench trials and one jury trial.[16]  The lone jury trial that Bade has presided over involved a personal injury suit arising from an automobile accident.[17]

Notably, Bade ruled that an Arizona Supreme Court rule that required attorneys seeking admission in Arizona to have reciprocal admission for Arizona attorneys was valid under the Dormant Commerce Clause and the First Amendment.[18]

In her time as a judge, Bade has had her reports and recommendations rejected by district judges in six cases.[19]  In an additional six cases, Bade’s reports and recommendations have been partially rejected by district judges.[20]  Furthermore, in four cases, Bade’s rulings were reversed on appeal.[21]

Overall Assessment

Bade may not have been the Administration’s first choice for the Ninth Circuit, but she may nonetheless prove to be the right one.  As a (relatively) older nominee with judicial experience, Bade is unlikely to attract the lightning rod of opposition that Langhofer or Burnham could have.  In fact, had it not been for her home-state senator’s blockade on judicial confirmations, it is likely that Bade would have been confirmed before the end of the year.

That being said, Bade may still ultimately draw negative votes in both committee and on the floor as her hearing was held over a recess, with no Democrats present.  Despite that factor, however, Bade is likely to be confirmed early next year (assuming that Senator-elect Kyrsten Sinema raises no objections).


[1] Sen. Comm. on the Judiciary, 115th Cong., Bridget Bade: Questionnaire for Judicial Nominees 1.

[2] Id. at 2.

[3] Id.

[4] Id.

[5] Jeremy Duda, The Flake and McCain Seal of Approval, Yellow Sheet Report, April 24, 2017.

[6] See Jeremy Duda, Don’t Count Langhofer Out Yet, Yellow Sheet Report, April 26, 2017.

[7] See id.

[8] Betsy Woodruff, Alleged Mueller Witness James Burnham Is On Trump’s Judicial Wish List, Daily Beast, Oct. 8, 2017, https://www.thedailybeast.com/alleged-mueller-witness-james-burnham-is-on-trumps-judicial-wish-list.  

[9] See Bade, supra n. 1 at 64.

[10] See id. at 44-45.

[11] Center for Responsive Politics, https://www.opensecrets.org/donor-lookup/results?name=bridget+bade&cycle=&state=&zip=&employ=&cand= (last visited Nov. 15, 2018).  

[12] See Bade, supra n. 1 at 4-6 (listing her professional affiliations).

[13] See id. at 47.

[14] See Bates v. Tenco Services, Inc., et al., CV 87-1313-SB (D.S.C.).

[15] Castillejos v. United States, CV 08-1645-DKD (D. Ariz.); Lopez-Sauceda v. United States, CV 07-2267-DGC (D. Ariz.).

[16] See Bade, supra n.1 at 23.

[17] Valejo v. Grietl, et al., Case No. CV-13-01687-PHX-BSB (D. Ariz.).

[18] Nat’l Assoc. for the Advancement of Multijurisdictional Practice v. Berch, 973 F. Supp. 2d 1082 (D. Ariz. 2013), aff’d, 773 F.3d 1037 (9th Cir. 2014), cert. denied, 135 S. Ct. 2374 (2015).

[19] Pouncey v. Maricopa Cnty. Sheriff’s Off., No. CV-17-723-PHX-JAT (BSB) (D. Ariz. Sept. 11, 2017); Dominguez-Rojas v. United States, No. CV-16-2179-PHX-SRB (BSB), (D. Ariz. Apr. 25, 2017); Brinkman v. Ryan, 2016 WL 7474014 (D. Ariz. Dec. 27, 2016); Grant v. United States, 2016 WL 6327762 (D. Ariz. Oct. 31, 2016); Muktadir v. Donahue, No. CV-15-2009-PHX-ROS (BSB), 2017 WL 4349390 (D. Ariz. Mar. 31, 2016); Gibson v. Sternes, No. CV-14-8156-PHX-DLR (BSB) (D. Ariz. May 1, 2015).  

[20] Amaral v. Ryan, No. CV-16-594-PHX-JAT (BSB), 2017 WL 6463052 (D. Ariz. Dec. 19, 2017); Flowers v. O’Neil, No. CV-15-2670-PHX-JAT (BSB), 2017 WL 6276367 (D. Ariz. Dec. 11, 2017); Hiland v. Ryan, No. CV-13-8110-PHX-PGR (BSB), 2017 WL 3953945 (D. Ariz. June 29, 2015); Bosquez v. Ryan, No. CV-13-1714-PHX-PGR (BSB), (D. Ariz. Mar. 10, 2015); Equal Employment Opportunity Comm’n v. Recession Proof, No. CV-11-1355-PHX-BSB, 2013 WL 6327994 (D. Ariz. Dec. 5, 2013); Olmos v. Ryan, No. CV-11-344-PHX-GMS (BSB)(D. Ariz. June 24, 2013).

[21] Velasco v. United States, No. CV-15-1389-PHX-NVW (BSB), 2018 WL 947667 (9th Cir. Feb. 5, 2018; Colter v. Berryhill, 685 F. App’x 616 (9th Cir. 2017); Miller v. Parties, No. CV-16-1427-PHX-DGC (BSB), 2017 WL 6210796 (9th Cir. July 27, 2017); Baxla v. Colvin, 671 F. App’x 477 (9th Cir. 2016)

1 Comment

  1. “(assuming that Senator-elect Kyrsten Sinema raises no objections).” What makes you think it would make any difference if she did? It wouldn’t, and it shouldn’t. The notion that a single senator should get a veto over an appeals court judge, or even a district court judge is complete rubbish. Especially with district court judges frequently issuing nation wide injunctions.

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